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Free TRIVIA ANSWERS for 2005

On this page we broaden our scope from the unusual aspects of Sydney geography to the unusual aspects of world geography and to quirky matters in general.

Trivia questions are at Free Trivia Questions 2004 and at Free Trivia Questions 2005 and at Free Trivia Questions 2006 and at Free Trivia Questions 2007 and at Free Trivia Questions 2008 and at Free Trivia Questions 2009 and at Free Trivia Questions 2010 and at Free Trivia Questions 2011 and at Free Trivia Questions 2012 and at Free Trivia Questions 2013 and at Free Trivia Questions 2014

Free answers to the trivia questions are at Free Trivia Answers 2004 and at Free Trivia Answers 2005 and at Free Trivia Answers 2006 and at Free Trivia Answers 2007 and at Free Trivia Answers 2008 and at Free Trivia Answers 2009 and at Free Trivia Answers 2010 and at Free Trivia Answers 2011 and at Free Trivia Answers 2012 and at Free Trivia Answers 2013 and at Free Trivia Answers 2014

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 30 December 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on the calendar:

(1) The Ethiopian calendar has 10 months, including a very short month. (Question was: "What makes the Ethiopian calendar unusual?")

(2) Fewer people are born in the first six months of the year because it has less days—three less, or two less in a leap year. (Question was: "Why are fewer people born in the first six months of the year than the second six months?")

(3) There are one, two or three Fridays the 13th in a year. Three Fridays 13th occur if 13 February is a Friday in an ordinary year or 13 January in a leap year. (Question was: "How many Fridays the 13th are there in a year?")

(4) The anagram of “eleven plus two” is “twelve plus one”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 23 December 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on gardening:

(1) Physiotherapists gain most business from people injured while gardening.

(2) About 8 000 Britons seek medical aid each year for injuries suffered while gardening. (Signs of the Times)

(3) A pedologist studies soil.

(4) The anagram of “It actions a cure and aims to heal ails” is “The Australian Medical Association.”

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 16 December 2005

Answers to last week’s Christmas questions:

(1) Hell is in Norway and Christmas is in Florida, USA

(2) 9999 is Australia Post’s postcode for all mail addressed to Santa.

(3) In Finland, Santa uses a sleigh to deliver presents to children, just like he does everywhere else. (Question was: "(3) What mode of transport does Santa use to deliver presents to children In Finland? (a) a goat (b) an igloo (c) a sleigh, just like anywhere else")

(4) The anagram of “the fat sir charms” is “Father Christmas”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 9 December 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on travel permits:

(1) Vatican State allows entry to anyone without a passport. (Question was: "What independent state allows entry to anyone without a passport?")

(2) Somalia doesn’t require anyone to have a visa to enter or leave because it has no functioning government. (Question was: "What is the only country where no-one is required to have a visa to enter or leave?")

(3) England calls its train tickets "permits to travel". (Question was: "The government of what country requires its citizens to have a "permit to travel" if they want to take a train more than 50 kilometres from their homes? (a) Cuba (b) England (c) Russia")

(4) The anagram of “Aggro! A slow trip!” is Glasgow Airport.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 2 December 2005

Answers to last week’s questions about armies:

(1) As a landlocked country, Liechtenstein has no navy. Its 80-man army was disbanded in 1868. (Lonely Planet “Western Europe”) (Question was: "Which is larger of Liechtenstein’s army and navy?")

(2) The world’s most heavily militarised area is the Demilitarised Zone between North and South Korea.

(3) The only country that fought from beginning to end in each of World Wars I and II, Vietnam and the two Persian Gulf conflicts against Iraq was Australia.

(4) The anagram from “Bad slip: booms!” is “bomb disposal”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 25 November 2005

Answer to last week’s questions on national borders:

(1) The five mainland European nations which have a border with one, and only one, other nation are Denmark, Monaco, Portugal, San Marino and Vatican State. You could also argue well for Knights of Malta (sometimes claimed to be the world’s smallest independent state) and Gibraltar (the UK territory surrounded by Spain).

(2) Fourteen countries share a border with Russia.

(3) Other than Canada and Mexico, which border it, the closest country to the USA is Russia. (Question was: "Other than Canada and Mexico, which border it, which country is closest to the USA? ")

(4) The anagram of “Coma, no?” is Monaco.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 18 November 2005

Answers to last week’s world currencies questions:

(1) The Cook Islands has three-dollar notes. (Question was: "What is unusual about Cook Islands currency? (a) three-dollar notes (b) triangular notes (c) edible notes")

(2) Panama’s currency is the US dollar. The country doesn’t bother printing its own currency, but it calls the dollar the balboa. (Question was: "What is Panama’s currency?")

(3) You get one hundred raindrops for one unit of Botswana’s currency. There are 100 thebes to the pula; “thebe” means “raindrop” and “pula” means “rain”. (Lonely Planet) Question was: "How many raindrops do you get for one unit of Botswana’s currency?")

(4) The anagram from “Car.air.expenses.com” is “American Express Co”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 11 November 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on world religions:

(1) Cambodia’s Anghor Wat temple is Hindu turned Buddhist.

(2) The predominant religion of Bethlehem is Islam.

(3) The first names of the present pope’s parents were Mary and Josef.

(4) The anagram from “Pepsi-Cola” is “Episcopalian”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 4 November 2005

Answers to last week’s questions about colours:

(1) The original colour of the White House was grey.

(2) Aicraft black boxes are orange.

(3) The original colour of Coca-Cola was green.

(4) The anagram from “epileptic soda” is “Diet Pepsi-Cola”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 28 October 2005

Answers to last week’s questions about royalty:

(1) For the past 500 years, Danish kings have been alternately named Christian and Frederik. (Question was: "Besides King Christian and King Frederik, how many Danish kings of the past 500 years can you name?")

(2) The first Australian-born person to become a member of a royal family was Denmark’s Princess Mary. She and Crown Prince Frederik last month became parents of the likely Prince Christian.

(3) The only house in England that the queen may not enter is the House of Commons, because she is not a commoner.

(4) The anagram of “she outs the royal winners” is “the New Year’s Honours List”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 21 October 2005

Answers to last week’s volcanoes questions:

(1) The Aitken Crater that is at least three days’ travel from the nearest civilization is on the moon.

(2) The Krakatoa volcano eruption was heard 4800km away. (Reader's Digest Book of Facts)

(3) 80% of the world’s known volcanoes have never caused any property damage because they are under water.

(4) The anagram from “Fame! Neil A Armstrong plants feet (a hip) on moon and talks” is “That’s one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 14 October 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on volcanoes:

(1) The natural event that caused the loudest sound ever recorded was a volcanic eruption, that of Krakatoa. (The Third Degree of Trivia)

(2) All but one of the 30 000 inhabitants of St Pierre were killed by an eruption of Mt Pelee volcano in 1902. That one survived because he was locked up in a thick-walled prison awaiting execution the following day.

(3) When the Beeren Berg volcano on Jan Mayen Island in the Greenland Sea erupted in 1970 all the 39 male inhabitants of the island were evacuated. No female inhabitants were evacuated simply because there were no female inhabitants. (Guinness Book of Records)

(4) The anagram from “They plan the date” is “the death penalty”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 7 October 2005

Answers to last week’s questions about islands:

(1) There are 7000 islands in the Philippines when it is high tide. At low tide the country has 7100 islands. (Question was: "When are there 7000 islands in the Philippines?")

(2) The world’s largest island after Greenland is Papua New Guinea. (Question was: "Because Australia is regarded as a continent, Greenland is the world's largest island. What is second largest?")

(3) Inaccessible Island is virtually inaccessible. It is in the Atlantic Ocean, in a remote spot between South America and Africa. (Question was " Is Inaccessible inaccessible?")

(4) The anagram from “O, mile trek” is “kilometre”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 30 September 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on marathon running:

(1) Arvina Pandya of India ran backwards across the USA from Los Angeles to New York. (Guinness Book of Records). (Question was: "Arvina Pandya of India ran across the USA from Los Angeles to New York in 107 days. What was special about the way he ran?")

(2) Timothy Badyna of the USA ran backwards in the Toledo, Ohio, marathon. His time of 3 hours 53 minutes 17 seconds beat the majority of forwards runners. (Guinness Book of Records). (Question was: "Timothy Badyna of the USA ran the Toledo, Ohio, USA marathon on 24-4-94 in 3 hours 53 minutes 17 seconds. What was special about the way he ran?")

(3) Approximately what percentage of official finishers in a marathon race are aged under 18? Approximately 0%. Almost all marathons are restricted to those 18 and over.

(4) The anagram from “Oh man, a rotten hurt” is “To run the marathon”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 23 September 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on people’s names around the world:

(1) Gonxha Bojaxhiu was the world’s most admired woman when she died in India in 1997 as Mother Theresa.

(2) What were French composer Julien’s given names? If you got this right, you were doing fairly well. Julien had 36 given names. (Top Ten of Everything)

(3) The most common first name for a male worldwide is Mohammad.

(4) The anagram from “Script: he ever hero” is Christopher Reeve.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 16 September 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on roads

(1) The only US state capital not linked by road to anywhere else is Juneau, Alaska.

(2) Major roads in Alaska and Hawaii have interstate highway numbers as elsewhere in the USA, but it is impossible to travel interstate from either of those as they have no adjoining state. (Question was: "Which two states of the USA have interstate highways but can’t have interstate highways?")

(3) The republic of Nauru has one road, of 16 kilometres. (Question was: "How many roads are there in the republic of Nauru?")

(4) The anagram from “my car” is “Camry”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 9 September 2005

Answers to last week’s questions about bridges:

(1) More than a thousand people have committed suicide by jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge. The 1000th person jumped to his death in January 1996.

(2) The 11-kilometre bridge linking Prince Edward Island to the Canadian mainland has curves simply to maintain drivers’ concentration. (Guinness Book of Records)

(3) The 1831-built London Bridge is in Arizona, at Lake Havaru.

(4) The anagram from “has sculptured altar” is “St Paul’s Cathedral”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 2 September 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on newspapers:

(1) The Sacramento Bee is a newspaper.

(2) When the Lancashire Evening Post ran the headline “All the Passengers are Safe” it was reporting on the sinking of the "Titanic" (Return of Heroic Failures) (The question was: " On what event was it reporting when the Lancashire Evening Post ran the headline "All the Passengers are Safe"?")

(3) Under Saddam Hussein’s rule just one person had his picture in the Iraqi press. His was the only picture permitted to appear. (The Sydney Morning Herald)

(4) The anagram of “Ah, tonight’s top news” is “The Washington Post”

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 26 August 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on country names:

(1) The “stan” in the names of countries such as Afghanistan means place. So “Afghanistan” means “Afghanis’ place”.

(2) Greenland has the ice, but Iceland has the green. Greenland was named by Eric the Red, who sailed from Iceland in AD982. The name was a sales ploy to entice people to migrate there and afford him some company. Iceland was so-named to deter migrants. On the other hand, half of this answer might well be just myth.(Question was: "How did Greenland and Iceland get their names?")

(3) In its first eight letters, the country name Kyrgyzstan has an amazing eight consonants, and therefore no vowels.

(4) The anagram from “Leprechaun fib I retold” is “The Republic of Ireland"

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 19 August 2005

Answers to last week’s cricket questions:

(1) About 0.01% of Americans play cricket.

(2) After the first three balls from Sri Lanka in the 26-11-99 test match, Zimbabwe had a score of 3 wickets down for 0 runs. Sri Lanka had achieved the first hat trick from the first three balls in test cricket. (Question was: "What was special about Zimbabwe’s score after the first three balls from Sri Lanka in their test match on 26-11-99?")

(3) In what sport besides cricket is the ball always in possession of the team on defence, and the offensive team can score without touching the ball? Baseball, and its varieties such as softball and rounders.

(4) The anagram of “O man, I bat” is Ian Botham.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 12 August 2005

1) Roman numerals were invented in India.

(2) The Pakistanis invented the bagpipes.

(3) Indian ink was invented in China.

(4) The anagram from “I am on a march” is “Chairman Mao”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 5 August 2005

Answers to last week’s question on capital cities:

(1) The name of the settlement that became the capital of Christmas Island is The Settlement.

(2) Pierre, Olympia and Lincoln are capitals of US states; Chicago is not.

(3) Jerusalem is the capital city of Israel according to Israel; it’s Tel Aviv according to most other countries, siting their embassies in Tel Aviv.

(4) The anagram of “Find cool Tony” is “City of London”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 29 July 2005

(1) Cape Canaveral was formerly called Cape Kennedy. What was it called before Cape Kennedy? Cape Canaveral.

(2) As seen from space, Las Vegas is the brightest city in the world.

(3) The record for the shortest visit to Earth by people from space is 84 days, by the Columbia astronauts forced home on 8 April 97 by a power failure four days into their flight. They were relaunched on 1 July 97 to finish their mission.

(4) The anagram from “alien forms” is “life on Mars”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 22 July 2005

Answer to last week’s walking questions:

(1) The unusual activity offered in the far north of The Netherlands is walking in mud. And it’s important that you keep walking. If you stop, you sink in the mud to the waist or worse. (Question was: "What unusual type of walking, after which you need a good wash, is conducted from Noørdpolderzijl, The Netherlands? ")

(2) Zebra tracks are narrow and distinct because they walk in single file and their left and right feet touch the ground almost in a straight line.

(3) The 15-year-old girl found sleeping on the concrete counterweight of a 40-metre-tall crane in Dulwich, London, last month reached there by sleepwalking.

(4) The anagram from “Land hairy – kill customer!” is “KLM – Royal Dutch Airlines”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 15 July 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on walking:

(1) The main recreational activity on Australia’s Lake Mungo and on the rest of the Willandra Lakes chain is walking. The “lakes” have been dry for 15 000 years. (Sydney Morning Herald)

(2) Malaysia’s Laban Rata Restaurant opens between 2.00am and 3.30am because it is at 11 000 feet on Mt Kinabalu; from it walkers leave between 2.30 and 3.30am each morning in order to reach the summit in time for a spectacular sunrise.

(3) After a cow's left front foot touches the ground when it is walking, the next foot to touch the ground is its right back foot. It is difficult to solve this without getting down on all fours to check.

(4) The anagram from “the man or a car” is “marathon race”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 8 July 2005

Answers to last week’s trivia:

(1) What do the Costa Rican army and Swiss navy have in common? Non-existence

(2) The two leaders of the rebels from the Burmese insurgent group, God’s Army, that held 700 hostages at a Thai hospital were aged 12.

(3) The seemingly worthless area that has been the world’s most besieged land since the Early Bronze Age is the Sinai Desert.

(4) The anagram from “Red alert: US may hit Iraq” is “military headquarters”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 1 July 2005

Answers to last week’s questions about London’s Wimbledon Tennis Championships:

(1) Fred Perry, the last British player to win the Wimbledon men’s singles, was also the world table tennis champion.

(2) In 2003, male players were excused, for the first time, from bowing to the royal box. (Question was: "What were male players excused from doing, for the first time, in 2003 championships? (a) attending post-match press conferences (b) bowing to the royal box (c) wearing all-white clothing")

(3) Roger Federer had no coach when he won the Wimbledon singles for the second consecutive time last year. Question was: "Who was Roger Federer’s coach when he won Wimbledon for the second successive time in 2004?")

(4) The anagram of “rugged kisser” is Greg Rusedski.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 24 June 2005

Answers to last week’s questions about London’s Wimbledon Tennis Championships:

(1) Titanium oxide is used for marking the lines on the Wimbledon courts.

(2) The full name of the Wimbledon club is the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club.

(3) Wimbledon men’s singles finalist Vere Goold was a murderer. (Question was: "What makes Vere Goold unique amongst Wimbledon Men's Singles finalists? (a) He had only one arm. (b) He was a murderer. (c) He was a priest.")

(4) The anagram of ”posh Tim Henman chips lob wide” is “The Wimbledon Championships”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 17 June 2005

Answers to last week’s questions about France:

(1) Kilts originated in France.

(2) No-one resides at Number 13, Champs-Elysées, Paris, because there is no Number 13. French streets like to avoid that number.

(3) French is spoken in eight of the 16 West African countries.

(4) The anagram from “Chicken? No, frogs” is “French cooking”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 10 June 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on the French tennis championships:

(1) The winner of the 1993 French Junior Girls’ (under 19) singles, Martina Hingis, was aged only 12. (Question was: "Why was the 1993 French Junior Girls' Tennis Championship (for under 19s) not won by a teenager?")

(2) How many second serves did Mats Wilander put into play in the French singles final when he beat Henri Laconte in three sets? None. He put 100% of his first serves into play, and therefore did not have any second serves.

(3) Does Luke Jensen, winner of the French Men's Doubles tennis title, serve right- or left-handed? Yes. He is ambidextrous, often changing hands between a first and second serve.

(4) The anagram from “Hit’s in! A grin, Ma!” is Martina Hingis.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 3 June 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on accidents:

(1) The 1968 exhibition at Harrogate, UK, by the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents was marred somewhat when the entire display fell down. (Book of Heroic Failures) (Question was: "What happened to the 1968 exhibition at Harrogate by the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents?")

(2) It will be another 25 000 years before the radiation from the nuclear reactor that exploded at Chernobyl in April 1986 will have dropped to a safe level.

(3) Colliding with a deer is the cause of the largest number, 30%, of Swedish road accidents.

(4) The anagram from “mishap…but locate clues” was “Space Shuttle Columbia”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 27 May 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on time:

(1) The timepiece with the most moving parts is the sandglass, and that with the least moving parts is the sundial, with none. (Question was: " Of all of history’s timepieces, which had the most moving parts and which had the least moving parts?")

(2) Time of day in Ethiopia begins at sunrise, so our 7am is called 1am in Ethiopia. (Question was: "Why does the sun rise before 1 o’clock every morning in Ethiopia?")

(3) What time is it at the North Pole? You can take your pick, as 24 time zones meet there.

(4) The anagram from “wonkey items there” is “The New York Times”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 20 May 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on street names:

(1) The most common street name in Sydney is Park Street. (Question was: "What is the most common street name in Sydney, Australia? - Try thinking of something that almost every suburb has, like a church or a railway station. But no, it’s not Church Street or Railway Street.")

(2) If you followed our suggestion and made a second choice for this answer, congratulations! The most common street name in the USA is Second Street. Park Street is second, followed by Third, Fourth and Fifth Streets, before First Street gets a place. (The Top Ten of Everything). (Question was "(2) What is the most common street name in the USA? - It’s most unlikely to be the same as your answer to the first question, so try a second choice.")

(3) The main street in Latvia’s capital, Riga, has enjoyed all the names of Adolf Hitler Strasse, Alexander Boulevard, Freedom Street and Lenin Street, depending on what country last “liberated” it. (Signs of the Times)

(4) The anagram from “to race in” is “a Citroen”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 13 May 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on Venice:

(1) St Mark’s Square in Venice now floods in about one day in three.

(2) Venice gondolas are painted black because that is a legal requirement. Only high public officials’ gondolas are exempt. (Absolute Trivia) (Question was: "Why are all Venice gondolas painted black?")

(3) The essential qualification for applying for a licence to be a Venice gondolier is that you are a native Venetian. (Discovery Channel)

(4) The structure not far from Venice which is an anagram of “I warn thee of giant slope” is “The Leaning Tower of Pisa”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 6 May 2005

Answer to last week’s questions on mountains:

(1) The Dundozonananandana Mountains are in Namibia, near Etosha National Park. (Question was: "Where are the Dundozonananandana Mountains? (a) Antarctica (b) Namibia (c) Siberia")

(2) The highest climbs that veteran Apa Sherpa has completed are his 12 to the summit of Mount Everest. (Question was: "What are the 12 highest climbs that veteran Apa Sherpa has completed?")

(3) Latvia has no mountains. Its highest point is 312 metres above sea level; mountains are defined as being “over 1000 feet” (328 metres). (Question was: "What is Latvia’s highest mountain?")

(4) “Anagram” is an anagram of “a ragman”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 29 April 2005

Answers to last week’s wildlife questions:

(1) The Queen owns all of England’s swans. (University of Sydney Diary)

(2) About 10 million penguins live on South Georgia Island. We assume that the life expectancy of the local fish is not great.

(3) Outside of zoos, all penguins are in the southern hemisphere, primarily in the Antarctic. (Absolute Trivia)

(4) The anagram of “flutter by” is “butterfly”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 22 April 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on countries:

(1) Sudan is Africa’s largest country.

(2) “Costa Rica” means “rich coast”; “El Salvador” means “the Saviour” and “Guatemala” means “land of many trees”. (Question was: "What Central American countries’ names mean “rich coast”, “the Saviour” and “land of many trees”?")

(3) The Sahara Desert is found in Algeria, Chad, Egypt, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Niger, Sudan and Tunisia.

(4) “But I’m in a desert area” is an anagram of United Arab Emirates.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 15 April 2005

Answers to last week’s questions from Poland:

(1) The opening point in the 1936 Swathling Cup table tennis match between Poland’s Alex Ehrich and Romania’s Paneth Farcas went for two hours 12 minutes (Absolute Trivia)

(2) While imprisoned in Auschwitz, Witold Pileki organised an underground resistance movement.

(3) After World War II the Polish Government executed him. (Question was: " After the war, what happened to Witold Pileki? (a) He became president of Poland. (b) The Polish Government awarded him its highest honour, the Polish Cross with Gold Star, one of only three ever given. (c) The Polish Government executed him.")

(4) The anagram of “The speech is Latin” is “The Sistine Chapel”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 8 April 2005

Answers to last week's questions (they all related to Pope John Paul II):

(1) Pope John Paul II drew the largest single crowd in history—three million people, in Mexico. (The question was: " Who drew the largest single crowd in history?")

(2) Karol Josef Wojtyla was John Paul II’s name before becoming Pope.

(3) John Paul II logged more kilometres of travel that all the other 262 popes combined.

(4) The anagram of “Quit cares. In peace” is “Requiescat in pace”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 1 April 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on small countries:

(1) Which is the third largest country out of Trinidad and Tobago and Sao Tome and Principe? You are too clever. There are only two countries in that question; Trinidad and Tobago is larger than Sao Tome and Principe.

(2) Besides Australia and Canada, mentioned last week, the other members of the British Commonwealth are Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Botswana, Brunei, Cameroon, Cyprus, Dominica, Ghana, Grenada, Guyana, India, Jamaica, Kenya, Kiribati, Lesotho, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Nauru, New Zealand, Nigeria (suspended 1995), Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, St Christopher and Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent and the Grenadines, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Swaziland, Tanzania, The Gambia, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Kingdom, Vanuatu, Western Samoa, Zambia, Zimbabwe. That’s 53, but there are also 14 British dependent territories: Anguilla, Bermuda, British Antarctic Territory, British Indian Ocean Territory, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Falkland Islands, Gibraltar, Montserrat, Pitcairn Island, Saint Helena, Saint Helena Dependencies (Ascension, Tristan da Cunha), South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, Turks and Caicos lslands (British Tourist Office July 2002)

(3) Besides Denmark, which you thought of quickly, the only countries with names beginning with “D” are Djibouti, Dominica and Dominican Republic.

(4) An anagram of “enemy” is “Yemen”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 25 March 2005

Answers to last week's questions on world rivers:

(1) A drop of water takes at least four years to travel from the headwaters of the Colorado River to the Gulf of California. In some years no water makes it to the gulf. (National Geographic December 2001). (Question was: "How long does it take a drop of water to travel from the headwaters of the Colorado River to the Gulf of California? (a) almost a week (b) several months (c) years")

(2) Every twist of the Gambia River in The Gambia is matched by a similar twist in the country’s borders. (Question was: "Every twist of the Gambia River is matched by something that is approximately 20 kilometres from each bank. What is this?")

(3) How many rivers would be needed to fill an empty Lake Bailkal in one year? All of them. Russia’s Lake Baikal is the world’s deepest. All the rivers in the world would take a year to fill it if it were empty. (Discovery Channel’s World’s Best Natural Wonders)

(4) The water transport that is an anagram of “ocean” is “canoe”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 18 March 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on cars:

(1) An “emergency taxi” in Harare is a very crowded taxi. (Question was: "What is an "emergency taxi", or ET, in Harare, the capital of Zimbabwe? (a) a very crowded taxi (b) an ambulance (c) a biscuit with rhinoceros-horn filling shaped like a car")

(2) Taxis travel at 180 kilometres an hour between Abu Dhabi and its airport. (Question was: "(2) At what speed to taxis travel between the United Arab Emirates capital, Abu Dhabi, and its airport? (a) 18kmh (b) 81kmh (c) 180kmh")

(3) Rudolf Diesel patented the diesel engine.

(4) The anagram of “does a country trail” is Toyota Landcruiser.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 11 March 2005

Answers to last week’s questions about world railways:

(1) When Mr and Mrs William Farmer of Margate, near Dover, travelled across England to Wales in 1971 for their summer holidays, the British Rail mystery tour they boarded in Wales took them straight back to Margate. Declining a tour of the town, Mr and Mrs Farmer popped home for a cup of tea. (Book of Heroic Failures)

(2) The form of US transport where the driver puts the main brake on when he wants to go and releases it when he wants to stop is the San Francisco cable-cars. The main brake grips the cable.

(3) On 11 June 1998 the Japanese train sent to help another that had broken down got it moving by crashing into it, injuring 35. (Question was: " On 11 June 1998 a Japanese train was sent to help another that had broken down. How did the second train get the first one moving?")

(4) The anagram from “Blimey! A later wait” is “railway timetable”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 4 March 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on road transport:

(1) Women are not allowed to drive in Saudi Arabia. (Question was: " What is Saudi Arabia's unique road rule?".)

(2) In South Africa traffic lights are called robots.

(3) Besides Britain, the other countries where you drive on the left side of the road are the Republic of Ireland and Malta

(4) The anagram of “O large monster” is General Motors.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 25 February 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on mountains.

(1) After climbing or taking the cable-car half-way up Israel’s Mount Massada you have reached an altitude of about 200 metres below sea level. (Question was: Approximately what altitude have you reached after climbing or taking the cable-car half-way up Israel's Mount Massada?

(2) The highest known mountain is on Mars—26km high Olympus Mons (Guinness Book of Records)

(3) Discounting Mount Ararat, because Noah went on water, history’s first recorded mountain climb was by Moses up Mount Sinai.

(4) The anagram of “I’d murder any hills” is the name of the first person to reach the summit of Mount Everest, Sir Edmund Hillary.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 18 February 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on USA states:

(1) The largest state of the USA is Alaska.

(2) Only one US state, Maine, has a name of just one syllable.

(3) Five states can be seen on a clear day from the top of the Empire State Building: New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts and Pennsylvania.

(4) The anagram from “a raw deal” is Delaware.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 11 February 2005

Last week’s questions were about countries.

(1) All of Germany, Denmark, Poland, Sweden and Russia have ruled Latvia.

(2) To travel due east from Azerbaijan to Azerbaijan, you pass through Armenia—it separates the two parts of Azerbaijan. (Question was: "To travel due east from Azerbaijan to Azerbaijan, what country do you pass through?")

(3) Seven countries—Norway, Sweden, Finland, Russia, USA, Canada and Greenland—are partly north of the Arctic Circle. How many countries are partly south of the Antarctic Circle? None.

(4) “Open chip shop, eat rice, be full!” is an anagram of “The People’s Republic of China”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 4 February 2005

Last week’s questions were about capital cities.

(1) What do the capital cities of Andorra, Djibouti, Gibraltar, Guatemala, Luxembourg, Macau, Mexico, Monaco, Panama, San Marino and Singapore have in common? The capital’s name is the same as its country’s name.

(2) The world’s last capital city alphabetically is Zagreb.

(3) The capital city within a capital city is Vatican City. It is within Rome.

(4) The anagram from “So, if all clean air’s gone?” is Los Angeles, California

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 28 January 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on cars:

(1) A swimming pool and diving board are provided for relaxation on the world’s longest car. (Guinness Book of Records). (Question was: "What is provided for relaxation in the world’s longest car?")

(2) The Volkswagen was conceived and designed in prison by Adolph Hitler. (Question was: "Who conceived and designed the Volkswagen car while he was in prison in 1923?")

(3) Every time you pass another car on Norfolk Island you are expected to wave.

(4) “Neutral” is an anagram of “Renault”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 21 January 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on seas:

(1) Unless extraction of water slows from rivers which flow into the Aral Sea, once the world’s fourth-largest, the lake will disappear before 2050. (Guinness Book of Records) (The question was: " The Aral Sea was once the fourth-largest lake in the world. Where is it expected to rank in 2050?")

(2) The country furthest from the sea (ie has all its borders furthest from the nearest sea or ocean), is Mongolia.

(3) What way does water flow in the Strait of Gibraltar? East and west. The surface flow carries Atlantic water eastward into the Mediterranean Sea, where it is subject to strong evaporation. The water’s salinity increases, making it denser. It then sinks and returns to the Atlantic Ocean by flowing westward along the bottom of the strait.

(4) The anagram of “rainfall saga” is “Niagara Falls”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 14 January 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on seas:

(1) The name “Dead Sea” is appropriate except for two problems: it is not dead and it is not a sea. It is not dead because salt-loving micro-organisms thrive there. And it is a lake, not a sea. (Reader's Digest Book of Facts). (Question was: "What is wrong with the name "Dead Sea"?")

(2) No-one drowned in the Dead Sea in the 1900s. It is 25 percent salt, making the water very heavy so no-one can drown in it. (Absolute Trivia). (Question was: "Approximately how many people drowned in the Dead Sea in the 1900s?")

(3) The Caspian Sea is not a sea. It is the world’s largest lake.

(4) The anagram of “lies stranded” is “desert island”.

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Free Trivia Answers to Questions for week ending 7 January 2005

Answers to last week’s questions on road transport around the world:

(1) Papua New Guinea’s buses, the PMVs, have no timetables or set routes. They just go where and when the majority of their passengers want to. (Question was: "What is unusual about the timetables for Papua New Guinea's buses, the PMVs?")

(2) The Gatti Gang cell of the Italian Red Brigade always travelled by bus when carrying out attacks because none of them knew how to drive a car. (Bulletin) (Question was "Why did the Gatti Gang cell of the Italian Red Brigade always travel by bus when carrying out attacks?")

(3) The British territory that has more underground roads than surface roads is Gibraltar. Its 50km of tunnels, large enough for trucks to drive through, is more than its total surface roads and streets. (Philadelphia Trumpet)

(4) When do most long-distance West African buses begin their journey? When they are full.

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Trivia questions are at Free Trivia Questions 2004 and at Free Trivia Questions 2005 and at Free Trivia Questions 2006 and at Free Trivia Questions 2007 and at Free Trivia Questions 2008 and at Free Trivia Questions 2009 and at Free Trivia Questions 2010 and at Free Trivia Questions 2011 and at Free Trivia Questions 2012 and at Free Trivia Questions 2013 and at Free Trivia Questions 2014

Free answers to the trivia questions are at Free Trivia Answers 2004 and at Free Trivia Answers 2005 and at Free Trivia Answers 2006 and at Free Trivia Answers 2007 and at Free Trivia Answers 2008 and at Free Trivia Answers 2009 and at Free Trivia Answers 2010 and at Free Trivia Answers 2011 and at Free Trivia Answers 2012 and at Free Trivia Answers 2013 and at Free Trivia Answers 2014

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